Death Fashion On Modern Era: Mourning Attire At Metropolitan Museum

We still haven’t had enough of fashion and while most eyes are tacked on the SS15, we at UrbanTabloid are scrutinizing this interesting fall costume exhibit. It is the perfect resemblance of modern death fashion and while some clothing are vintage-looking, the idea of conducting such unique and undeniably stunning exhibit is quite contemporary.

 

death fashion - 1
Via: metmuseum.org

Death Becomes Her is a Costume Institute exhibit that offers around 30 ensembles all with historic style. This rare public viewing of antique Victorian fashion features some of the gowns worn by Queen Alexandra and Queen Victoria, who mourned and wore nothing but black for around 40 years after her husband died. Preserved pieces by Charles Frederick Worth is also present.

death fashion - 2Via: metmuseum.org
death fashion - 3Via: metmuseum.org

This is the first fall exhibit of The Costume Institute, which can be viewed at The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Anna Wintour Costume Center. It is open for public from October 21st of this year to February 1st of next year. According to Harold Koda, curator in charge of The Costume Institute, “the predominantly black palette of mourning dramatizes the evolution of period silhouettes and the increasing absorption of fashion ideals into this most codified of etiquettes.”

death fashion - 4Via: metmuseum.org

The dresses featured in this one-of-a-kind modern death fashion exhibit date back around 1815 to 1915. While jewelries and other kinds of accessories are included in the exhibit, the intriguing and quite interesting theme of this fall show is what most people consider on why the decided to visit it.

death fashion - 5Via: news.instyle.com

All gowns are seamless and highly detailed. There are sequined dresses which may at first look plain fancy but once you really scrutinize it, you will realize it is a mix of modern and antique. Black dresses with satin ribbons, silk laces and silk taffetas are also here and there, offered in a variety of cuts and patterns. But despite the oldies look of this exhibit, the vibe of modernization is still present.